In Case You Missed It

1) This week, the ERLC held its national conference. Various speakers addressed “The Gospel, Homosexuality, and the Future of Marriage.” Watch the videos of the excellent talks and helpful panel discussions at their liveblog.

2) At SEND Network, Michael Rhodes offers some helpful advice on being an everyday neighborhood missionary.

3) In a continuing series, Ed Stetzer thinks about how churches can fix the biblical illiteracy problem.

4) Also at Ed Stetzer’s blog, Southeastern director of communications, Amy Whitfield writes wisely about social media, civil discourse, and the fear of missing out.

5) Today is October 31, Reformation Day. Justin Taylor offers some historical insight from Calvin on Luther’s (and his) right reasons for reforming the church.

 

In Case You Missed It

1) Two posts for this one. Southern Seminary president Al Mohler offered some historical reflection in light of the Supreme Court’s recent indecision on gay marriage. ERLC president Russ Moore also weighed in with some thoughts for how the church ought to respond. Both are well worth your time.

2) It’s a perplexing though powerful text. So John Piper clarified his take on Romans 7.

3) Ed Stetzer notes well that idolatry lives today, so pastors much guard and preach against it.

4) Thom Rainer offers a helpful list on seven ways the pastor’s family comes under attack.

David W. Jones on the Benefits of Christian Marriage

The faculty at Southeastern regularly contribute to the evangelical and SBC blogosphere. When they do, we want you to know about it. This week David Jones, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and Director of the Th.M. program at Southeastern, wrote about the benefits of Christian marriage. As an author, ethicist, and Christian husband for 20 years he is more than qualified to write on the topic. He gives sound, encouraging, and biblical wisdom for other husbands. 

The post appeared at Canon and Culture, the Christianity and Public Square blog of the ERLC. Here’s an excerpt:

Given the primacy of God’s glory and name, it stands to reason that the Lord would be jealous for his people, for they are created in order to glorify his name. Indeed, this is what Scripture records as in reference to his people God proclaims, “I am jealous for Zion with great jealousy” (Zech. 8:2). Additionally, a host of passages demonstrate the truth that when the Lord’s people begin to glorify other gods, it is then that his jealousy is most clearly aroused.

Within the institution of marriage, spouses have the unique opportunity to experience relational jealousy, thereby enabling them to understand the truth of God’s husband-love for his people, as well as the intensity of divine jealousy. In fact, the potential for jealousy in marriage is so great that the Old Testament civil law contains procedures for regulating a husband’s jealousy toward his wife (cf. Num. 5:11–31).

We strongly encourage you to read the full post here.